Common Pitfalls and How to Do a Standout Essay for Ivy leagues

For one to be admitted to Ivy League schools, the bare minimums are a 4.0 GPA, a 1570 SAT or higher (35–36 ACT) and being world-class in extracurriculars.


These statistics are no longer "good enough" to distinguish between candidates; instead, they are the typical grades and scores that the Ivy Leagues expect. Students' most significant error is not taking their application and essay writing process seriously enough.


The commonest red flags to look out for in an application essay include:


1. Avoid Being Wordy


Be succinct. Although there is no set maximum word count for the application essay and merely a suggested minimum of 250 words, every admissions officer has many applications to review daily and only has a short amount of time to read each essay. You are testing their patience if you write more than 700 words.


2. Avoid SPAG Errors


Your spelling, grammar, and punctuation must be impeccable. In addition to using spell checkers, you should pay attention to other aspects of proper writing mechanics, such as the usage of commas, semicolons, and other standard punctuation.


Imagine having this phrase in your essay- “I shall miss the friends I made and the times we spent together with the teachers I had boned with over the years.” Ideally, this student meant to write ‘bond’. I doubt any school would want to admit a student who sleeps around with the teachers.


To avoid such mistakes, talk to professional editors and proofreaders like writersqi.com.


3. Be Keen on How you Use Humor


You ought to be extra careful how you use comedy. You never know how a total stranger may react to you, especially if you say something funny. Anything blatantly xenophobic, racist, or misogynistic will raise eyebrows. For instance, if your essay is about how you enjoy painting swastikas on all the Jewish children's lockers because you find it amusing, I doubt you will be accepted.


Here are five incredible tips to help write an exceptional essay

  • Demonstrate passion

  • Be sincere

  • Create your story

  • Be logical

  • Display your uniqueness


4. Demonstrate Passion For Something


The admission panel want to see that you have a passion for something, whether it be marine biology or collecting vintage records. There are countless things out there that might catch your attention, but focusing on one that excites you might be challenging.


Candidates who have followed their passions have an edge in this situation. They'll surely demonstrate leadership skills and a dedication to something bigger than themselves.


Remember that prestigious universities want to assemble a unique first-year class where students can benefit from their teachers and one another.


5. Be Sincere and Truthful


Don't exaggerate your positions, accomplishments, or titles. Being the Green Club's treasurer or the newspaper's copy editor instead of the president is perfectly acceptable. Not everyone needs to excel in every endeavor.


Factual submissions must also accompany your truths. You cannot, for example, claim that people say you are a pretty fantastic singer without providing any proof or any basis in reality. Join a singing club to demonstrate this skill.


6. Create Your Own Story


Applications don't need to be "special" in the sense that some people try to make them. They only need to be sincere. When a student writes something to appear impressive and showy rather than something that reflects who they are and how college will fit into that, it's self-evident. A superb common application responds to four inquiries:

  • Who are you?

  • What's important to you?

  • What do you find interesting?

  • What your future plans are, and how will college fit into those plans?

  • No one has the same four reasons for the questions above.


7. Be Logical


In an essay, avoid attempting to cover everything. If you do this, you could come out as busy but also disorganized and shallow. The entire application is a collection of screen photos of your actions. Colleges anticipate this. Follow their lead.


8. Display Your Uniqueness


This is your best chance to stand out! Create the perfect explanation for both why you and the school are a good fit. Give specifics about how you plan to get involved in their school, such as which clubs you'll join. Which courses and instructors are you most looking forward to working with? Whom do you plan to learn from? What difference will you create on their campus and in the neighborhood?


Using your high school experiences and demonstrating how you will contribute to their campus will help you a lot in your application. Ivy League universities seek out exceptional, passionate, and sincere students. In the admissions process, you will stand out if you can demonstrate that you possess all three qualities.

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